4 Temptations Christian Leaders Face


I read this and thought – How Appropriate! It’s a thought I think every leader needs to ask themselves. What is your motive for doing what you do? Where do you fit in within these categories/questions? Adding to this article… I think the sign of a good leader is being able to learn from all ages. I am 28 years old; however, I have learned things from people who are 18 years old, and even 10 years old! A good leader never lets themselves think “they know it all”. The minute you stop listening to others  you forfeit your right to be a leader. (My personal opinion of course). This doesn’t mean every time someone voices an opinion you run with it – because you also have a mind of your own as a leader and there is a reason you were put into that position and not that other person… however… other people still have good ideas. One person’s idea might stir a new thought into your idea! KAPOW! Two heads were better than one 🙂

Original post: FOUR TEMPTATIONS CHRISTIAN LEADERS FACE
By: Michael Hyatt

  1. The temptation of priorities. Weak leaders put themselves last. They mistakenly think this is more spiritual. As I wrote in another post, it is a dangerous temptation that has left many leaders cynicaland burned out.But successful leaders face the opposite temptation. They put themselves first. In fact, some are outright narcissists, putting themselves at the center of their own universe. The correct position, I think, is second. Strong leaders put God first and themselves second. They know that they can’t meet the needs of others unless they attend to themselves.
  2. The temptation of entitlement. Weak leaders become convinced that they deserve something different. They lose any sense of delight or gratitude. They come to believe what others tell them: they are special and thus deserve preferential treatment.Successful leaders are alert to this temptation and war against it. It can sneak up when they least expect it. So they work hard to thank the people closest to them, knowing that their position is a privilege and likely temporary.
  3. The temptation of resentment. Weak leaders take offense at every slight. They are hyper-sensitive, reading into every situation more than is warranted. In the “movie” about them, there has to be drama.The reality is that offenses are inevitable. Jesus Himself said, “offenses must come” (Matthew 18:7). In fact, I would go so far as to say that God often sends offenses—for our good and for our sanctification. Strong leaders thus overlook offenses, knowing that this is the true mark of maturity and character (see Proverbs 19:11).
  4. The temptation of popularity. We live in a world that places a high value on fame and “personal branding.” We seem to have a list for everything, including the top 100 largest churches and the 100 fastest growing churches. It is difficult for me to imagine the early church—the church of the martyrs—compiling these kinds of lists.In reality, Jesus was a publicists’ nightmare. He eschewed fame. He miraculously healed people and then ordered them to keep it to themselves, telling no one about their experience (see, for example, Luke 5:12–14). Strong leaders are quick to give others the credit and avoid the limelight. They would rather be effective, even if they labor in obscurity.

The bottom line is this: Be careful what you pray for. Leadership is a burden—and a privilege. It is best held with an open hand. “The Lord giveth and Lord taketh away” (see Job 1:21).

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